EverWild’s Nature Immersion Program fosters eco-literacy in children by mentoring the development of 21st century skills and emotional intelligence. In a place-based context, children engage in experiential, inquiry-based and hands-on learning to gain a deeper understanding of their connection to nature.  

General Info.

Ages:

4.5-12

2 Mondays/month:

Hersel Farm, 3314 Serra Rd. Malibu CA 90265

Wednesdays:

Various Nature Destinations throughout Topanga State Park, the local canyons and beaches.

Hours: 

Drop off- 10am

Pick Up- 2:15pm


Free Tour Day

To reserve your free tour day please click the "Schedule a Free Tour Day" button below.


Pricing

$80/class

*20% Sibling Discount applied to days when siblings attend together 

Funding:

EverWild is a vendor for various charter schools that give families the opportunity to apply their charter school funds to our programs. Please review the list on our 'Homeschool Resources' Page or follow the link below.


Enroll Now

If you have attended a free tour day, please enroll in our classes through our Online Registration page.


Rhythm of the Day

10am - Drop-off & Sign-In

10:10am - Hike to Basecamp

10:20am - Welcoming the Tribe

This is a welcoming circle that happens at basecamp. Mentors share with the group the theme of the month, the project of the day and its relationship to the theme. Circle may also include storytelling, group game, group discussion.

10:30am - Exploration

We believe in the power of nature to provide the environment for deep, placed-based exploration. Children will build relationships with their peers, mentors and their natural environment. Project ideas organically surface through unencumbered play, art making, and experimenting with new tools and materials. Mentors observe and document strong group interests while providing supporting questions, materials and tools to encourage deeper learning.

12pm - Lunch

12:30pm - Sacred Project Time

Place-based projects provide the opportunity for gaining more knowledge about the natural environment and support the development of the child's 21st century skills.  Projects are driven by the group's interests and develop in relation to the theme of the month, our location and naturally occurring events in nature in collaboration with group members and mentors.  Mentors support group projects by providing materials and tools and encourage inquiry to guide the group towards the next step in their project. Children gain inspiration and learn from one another; experiencing all roles from leader, supporter, expert, apprentice, and friend.

1:30 pm - Nature Journaling

Mentors and children reflect on the experiences of the day through nature journaling. This can take place in the form of written word, sketches, video, photography, and group discussion.

1:45 pm - Closing Circle

This closing circle honors the work done for the day. Tribe members are welcome to share an excerpt from their journal. The group makes plans for the next adventure together.

2 pm - Hike out

The group hikes back to the pick-up location.

2:15 pm - Pick-Up & Sign-Out


How Does EverWild Focus on Developing the Whole Child?

With our high mentor to child ratio EverWild is able to support the development of each individual as they learn and develop at their own pace. Our program values Place-Based Education, Project-Based learning and 21st Century Skills.

I like EverWild because I am learning about myself.
— S. Clark (age 5)

Why does EverWild Value Place-Based Learning?

Before we can ask a child to help the Earth they must first build a relationship with it. Place-based learning immerses children in their immediate environment allowing them to gain an understanding of and discover their place within the world around them. As the child grows, the complexity and richness of their environment and knowledge of a particular place expands in breadth and depth.

Place-Based Education is the process of using the local community and environment as a starting point to teach concepts in reading and other language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts and other subjects across the curriculum.
— David Sobel

Why Does EverWild Value Project-Based Learning?

EverWild plants the seed for each child to participate in project-based learning by supporting the child and their interests. These projects can be one-off projects (projects that are short and typically begin and end in the same day) or they can become long-term projects. Long-term projects begin when a group or a child's interest peaks in a particular subject area and continues to reappear over the course of multiple days. 

Place-based projects provide the opportunity for gaining more knowledge about the natural environment and supports the development of the child's 21st century skills.  Projects are driven by the group's interests and develop in relation to the theme of the month, our location and naturally occurring events in nature in collaboration with group members and mentors.  Mentors support group projects by providing materials and tools and encourage inquiry to guide the group towards the next step in their project. Children collaborate and learn from one another in a mixed age group allowing for real world situations, social interactions and the practice of 21st century skills.

If we want children to flourish, to become truly empowered, then let us allow them to love the earth before we ask them to save it. Perhaps this is what Thoreau had in mind when he said, “the more slowly trees grow at first, the sounder they are at the core, and I think the same is true of human beings.
— David Sobel- Beyond Echophobia

Why Does EverWild Value Developing a Child's 21st Century Skills?

Project Based Learning supports the growth of children's 21st Century Skills including: Collaboration and TeamworkCreativity and ImaginationCritical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Children at EverWild direct and manage their own learning while inspiring and learning from one another; experiencing all roles from leader, supporter, expert, apprentice, and friend. Mentors and parents provide support and resources that aid in supporting the child throughout this learning process. 

I have been asked many times, ‘Why mixed ages?’. Of all the research I have done and experiences I have had I can sum it up with this simple example: When two children of a young age pass a ball back and forth, the game is likely to end quickly due to the lack of aim and ability to catch an off-target pass created by both of the young children. When a younger child and an older child pass a ball back and forth, the game is more likely to continue because the younger child is able to receive on-target passes from the older child and the older child is challenged to dive for the off-target passes from the younger child. We are lucky to see this kind of joy and magic happen every day at EverWild.
— Amanda C. EverWild Co-Founder

How does EverWild Incorporate Academic Subjects?

EverWild weaves academic subjects effortlessly into daily learning experiences.  Through exploration and projects children encounter real-time experiences applying natural science knowledge, mathematics, literacy, social studies, physical education and the arts. Children are challenged at an individually appropriate pace and expand upon the origin of their understanding as they grow developmentally in age.

Project Examples: 

Science: The life-cycle of a tadpole; composting; how to use edible and useful plants; solar ovens; building a wind powered boat; identifying rocks, plants, animals, animal tracks; watershed mapping; different environments and their relationship to each other; life-cycle of animals on land and water; anatomy of a local plant; etc.

Mathematics: Calculating measurements to build a tree house; counting wild parrots horses, flowers, fish; identifying the size of animal prints; measuring ingredients to cook pancakes over a fire; determining distance on a map; computing the time it takes us to hike from one place to the next; identifying geometric shapes in nature.

Literacy: Reading a book to discover more about an interest or inquiry; making a list of materials needed to develop a project; writing in our nature journals; reading a map; writing in the dirt, sand and mud; note taking on discoveries in nature and research to further the information about their discoveries; dramatic play; puppetry; storytelling; songs; poetry; etc.

Social Studies: Children learn about themselves, their relationship to their peers and their immediate surroundings. These learnings expand to encompass their towns, their state, their country, and the world as a child grows developmentally in age. Children investigate the questions: Why do people live where they do? And build where they do? Storytelling about the history of our locations and exploring them; Dramatic play resembling a time in history based on our location; Researching people and pioneers that relate to our project. EverWild's diversity allows for sharing and learning about each other's heritage, ancestry and cultural practices and perspectives.

Physical Education: Rock hopping; tree climbing; counterbalancing through a tide pool; group games; leaping across rocks; swimming in a tide pool; skipping and throwing rocks; climbing a rope; rock climbing; etc. Children become increasingly aware of their bodies in space as they maneuver through nature with their peers.

Arts: Drawing; painting; clay modeling; collage; woodworking; building shelters; singing; dancing; natural instruments; rhythm making. EverWild combines high-end art materials with materials found in nature to compose art. Children experiment and practice using different materials and gain an understanding of how materials interact with each other.